Monday, April 06, 2015

Major League Baseball implements new rules to speed up games




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As the 2015 Major League Baseball season gets into full swing on Monday, the league has implemented several new rules designed to speed up the pace of games.

"These changes represent a step forward in our efforts to streamline the pace of play. The most fundamental starting point for improving the pace of the average game involves getting into and out of breaks seamlessly.

"In addition, the batter's box rule will help speed up a basic action of the game," MLB commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement.

"The players believe that enforcing the rules that currently exist regarding between inning breaks and plate appearances is the best way to address the issue of pace of play.

"We're confident that today's announcements will have a positive impact on the pace of the game without jeopardizing the integrity of the competition,"  MLBPA executive director Tony Clark said in a statement.

"The Pace of Game Committee wants to take measured steps as we address this industry goal to quicken the pace of our great game.

"It is not an objective of ours to achieve a dramatic time reduction right away; it is more important to develop a culture of better habits and a structure with more exact timings for non-game action," Atlanta Braves president John Schuerholz, chairman of the Pace of Game and Replay Committee, said.

Here is the break down of the new rules:



PACE OF GAME






• The pace of game program will enforce the batter's box rule, requiring that all batters must keep at least one foot in the batter's box unless one of a group of exceptions occurs. The new rule at the Major League level mirrors 6.02(d), which was in place in Minor League Baseball in 2014.

• A second new component to the pace of game program is the addition of timers that will measure non-game action and break time between innings and pitching changes during each Major League game. One timer will be installed on or near the outfield scoreboard, and a smaller timer will be installed on the fa├žade behind home plate near the press box. Immediately following the third out of each half-inning, the timer will count down from 2:25 for locally televised games and from 2:45 for nationally televised games. An MLB representative attending each game will operate the timers from the ballpark and will track the following events:

Time Remaining: Activity
40 Seconds: PA announces batter and begins to play walk-up music
30 Seconds: Pitcher throws final warm-up pitch
25 Seconds: Batter's walk-up music ends
20 Seconds-5 Seconds: Batter enters the batter's box
20 Seconds-0 Seconds: Pitcher begins motion to deliver pitch

• Pitchers will be permitted to throw as many warm-up pitches as they wish prior to the point when 30 seconds remain on the clock; however, pitchers will be deemed to have forfeited any of their traditional eight warm-up pitches that they are unable to complete prior to the 30-second deadline. Exceptions to these rules will be made in a variety of circumstances, including if the pitcher or catcher ended the prior half-inning at bat or on base.

• Batters will be encouraged to get into the batter's box with 20 seconds remaining on the timer. This is the same time that the broadcasters return from commercial. The pitcher is expected to begin his motion to deliver the pitch as soon as the batter gets into the batter's box and becomes alert to the pitcher. Batters who do not enter the box prior to five seconds remaining on the timer and pitchers who do not begin the motion to deliver the pitch prior to zero seconds remaining on the timer will be deemed to have violated the break timing rules.

• These rules will be enforced through a warning and fine system, with discipline resulting for flagrant violators. No fines will be issued in Spring Training or in April of the 2015 regular season. Donations will be made to the Major League Baseball Players Trust charitable foundation based on the level of adherence to the new rules.

INSTANT REPLAY MODIFICATIONS

• Managers may now invoke instant replay from the dugout and will no longer be required to approach the calling umpire to challenge a call. Managers may hold play from the top step of the dugout by signaling to players and the home plate umpire that he is considering a challenge. A decision can be communicated verbally or with a hand signal. To challenge an inning-ending call, managers will be required to leave the dugout immediately in order to hold the defensive team on the field.

• Whether a runner left the base early or properly touched a base on a tag-up play will be reviewable.

• A manager will retain his challenge after every call that is overturned. Last year, a manager retained his challenge only after the first overturned call.

• A manager must use a challenge in order to review whether a play at home plate included a violation of the rule governing home plate collisions. However, in the event that a manager is out of challenges after the start of the seventh inning, the Crew Chief may still choose to review whether there was a violation of the rule.

• During Postseason games, regular season tiebreaker games and the All-Star Game, managers will now have two challenges per game.

• Instant replay will not be utilized during 2015 Spring Training, but it will be in place for exhibition games at Major League ballparks prior to the start of the 2015 regular season.




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